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CDC Alert: Rising Numbers of Deaths Involving Fentanyl and Fentanyl Analogs, Including Carfentanil, and Increased Usage and Mixing with Non-opioids News

Summary

This Health Alert Network (HAN) Update is to alert public health departments, health care professionals, first responders, and medical examiners and coroners to important new developments in the evolving opioid overdose epidemic, which increasingly involves illicitly manufactured fentanyl and an array of potent fentanyl analogs (i.e., compounds that are chemically related to fentanyl). It is the second update to the original health advisory, HAN 384, issued October 26, 2015, which alerted the public to the increase in unintentional overdose fatalities involving fentanyl in multiple states, primarily driven by illicitly manufactured fentanyl. The first update to this health advisory was released on August 25, 2016 (HAN 395), describing the sharp increase in the availability of counterfeit pills containing varying amounts of fentanyl and fentanyl analogs, the continued increase of overdose deaths involving fentanyl across a growing number of states, and the widening array of fentanyl analogs being mixed with heroin or sold as heroin.

The current update includes information on: (1) the continued increase in the supply of fentanyl and fentanyl analogs detected by law enforcement; (2) the sharp rise in overdose deaths involving fentanyl and fentanyl analogs in a growing number of states, in particular the growing number of deaths involving the ultra-high potency fentanyl analog known as carfentanil; (3) the expanding number of poly-drug combinations implicated in opioid overdose deaths, which include non-opioids, such as cocaine; (4) the updated comprehensive guidance available to law enforcement and other emergency responders to prevent occupational exposure to fentanyl and fentanyl analogs; and (5) updated recommendations for public health professionals and health care providers regarding prevention and response efforts.

Read the full article here: https://emergency.cdc.gov/han/han00413.asp

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Pretrial, Probation and Parole Supervision Week (July 15-21, 2018) News

July 15 through 21, 2018 is Pretrial, Probation and Parole Supervision Week.  If you recall your “Introduction to Criminal Justice” classes from college, you’ll remember that John Augustus, a boot maker and resident of Boston, is recognized as the “Father of Probation” and the first probation officer in the United States.  As the textbooks will tell you, in 1841, Augustus attended police court to bail out an acquaintance, who was a “common drunkard”.  The offender was ordered to appear in court a few weeks later for sentencing.   Accompanied by Augustus, the individual returned to court, sober and with a changed appearance.   At this time, Augustus began his 18 year career as a volunteer probation officer.  Augustus was credited with beginning the investigation process we now know in our system of probation.  He kept detailed notes on his actions and interactions with his probationers.  By 1858, Augustus has provided bail for 1,946 men and women.  Research indicates that only ten of this number forfeited their bond.  How about that recidivism rate! 

John Augustus

Upon reading several accounts of Augustus’ efforts, words such as “dogged persistence”, “zeal”, “compassion”, “respect”, “reform”, and “volunteer” appear.

On this 177th anniversary of the “Father of Probation” beginning his work in our field, the board of FPPOA recognizes that those same adjectives are within all of us.  Are these terms not the full description of our work in this profession?  Persistence, Compassion, Respect, Rehabilitation, and yes, how often are we “volunteering” our time. 

As the years add up for us in this career, and upon hearing of all the new ways we can perform our jobs as U.S. Probation and Pretrial Services Officers, we must reflect on the vision of the “Father of Probation.”  To add to the simple formula of Augustus, let’s add and emphasize the need for more officers and more financial resources.   Probation is a human interaction science.  It takes time for the officer to build a rapport and positive working relationship with the probationer.  This combination results in positive change.  (See recidivism rate referenced above.)

So during this Pretrial, Probation and Parole Supervision Week, the board of FPPOA recognizes and thanks all of you for your hard work and dedication to our very unique profession. 

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FEDS Professional Liability Insurance Webinar (video) News

Recently, FEDS conducted a Professional Liability Insurance Webinar designed specifically for FPPOA members.  In this webinar, FEDS explained the liability exposures of Federal Probation and Pretrial Services Officers, the coverage provided by FEDS professional liability insurance, and general reimbursement guidelines.  Below is a link to that recent webinar, in the event  you were unable to attend. 

https://youtu.be/9X89K6WCMH4

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Veterans History Project Hosts Panel Discussion on Effects of PTSD in Crime and Rehabilitation News

Original Article: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-18-043/veterans-history-project-hosts-panel-discussion-on-effects-of-ptsd-in-crime-and-rehabilitation/2018-04-19/

On any given day, 7 percent of the estimated 2.3 million people incarcerated in U.S. jails are men and woman who served in our armed forces

Press Contact: Benny Seda-Galarza (202) 707-8732 | Bryonna Head (202) 707-3073, |
Public Contact: Andrew Huber (202) 707-1819
Request ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 or ADA@loc.gov

The Veterans History Project at the Library of Congress, in collaboration with the National Institute of Corrections, will host a panel discussion on the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on veterans and how to support those who have run afoul of the law by providing appropriate treatment.

The panel of experts, in honor of Memorial Day and in anticipation of National PTSD Awareness Month, will be held on Thursday, May 17, at1 p.m.in room 119 on the first floor of the Library’s Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C.  Tickets are not needed but an RSVP is required. Reservations may be made by sending an email to ahub@loc.gov.

This event will also be livestreamed on the Library’s Facebook page at facebook.com/LibraryOfCongress and its YouTube site (with captions) at youtube.com/LibraryofCongress.

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Check your paycheck -- you might be getting too much money News

Here is an article describing the potential for under-withholding throughout 2018, due to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which would result in an individual having to pay the IRS a year from now when they complete their 2018 return instead of receiving a refund.

The IRS withholding calculator,
https://www.irs.gov/individuals/irs-withholding-calculator, is not yet updated to account for the changes to the tax law. 

We thought you would be interested in the following article found on MSN from The Washington Post: Check your paycheck -- you might be getting too much money 

“We suggest that people look at their withholdings every year, but most don’t,” said IRS spokesman Eric Smith. “But if ever there was a year to look at your withholdings, this is the year. Your current return is a road map of your tax situation.” 

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New Legislative Summary Article- Crime- Sentencing Reform News

On February 15, 2018, the Senate Judiciary Committee passed the Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act of 2017.  It has a long way to go to become law, but would have significant effects on federal sentencing, imprisonment (judicial parole), a number of sentencing reductions with retroactivity, new requirements for PSIRs, and reporting requirements on our system.

Read the latest updates to Crime-Sentencing Reform, part of The Legislative Summary for the 115th Congress. 

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FEDS: Ignorance is Expensive News

feds-logo.jpg

Bad things happen to good, conscientious, hardworking federal employees.  Far too many of you still think you are immune to allegations of wrongdoing, regardless of how many times we reinforce the need to have professional liability insurance. Unfortunately, ignorance is expensive.

As probation and pretrial officers, you are vulnerable to investigations and/or civil law suits as a result of actions and decisions made in the course and scope of your employment.  If an allegation is made against you, the challenge is having knowledgeable and effective counsel advocating on your behalf.  Your agency attorney is not your attorney.  It is the job of the agency attorney to defend the agency – not you.  You need to have counsel that has specific experience representing federal law enforcement officers.

Coverage is available for $290 annually.  Probation officers are eligible for agency reimbursement up to half the cost for a premium of $145 annually.  All employees are eligible for agency reimbursement regardless of reimbursement eligibility.  All policies are not the same – FPPOA recommends FEDS due to coverage, cost and customer service.  Don’t forget your $10 FPPOA discount.  Tell the FEDS representative or enter the discount code FPPOA when prompted. The discount code is case sensitive.

Enrollment takes less than 5 minutesCall 866.955.FEDS Monday – Friday 8am – 6pm ET or enroll on-line anytime at www.fedsprotection.com.  

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FCCA Leadership Lessons of Antietam News

The Federal Court Clerks Association is pleased to announce that we have opened registration for our 3rd annual Antietam Training opportunity for all Court Unit Executives and Chief Deputies entitled “Leadership Lessons of Antietam, A Leadership Workshop for Court Teams.”  The FCCA is sponsoring a two-and-a-half-day leadership workshop that will be held June 4th through June 7th in Shepherdstown, West Virginia.  Please open the attachments for more information, including information on how to register.

(See attached file: Antietam 2018.pdf)
(See attached file: Antietam Letter 2018.pdf)

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Investigators cope with viewing child pornography for work News

CLEVELAND (AP) — Canton police detective Bryan Allen watched a video on his computer that disturbed him so much that he left work and went home to process what he saw.

Allen is 22-year veteran of law enforcement and a member of the Cleveland FBI's Child Exploitation Task Force and the video was of a man raping a boy, no older than two years old. Allen is required to look at these sorts of videos as part of his job, and his job takes its toll.

"Some of them just take it out of you," the 48-year-old detective said.

Allen and the hundreds of other investigators who work child pornography and exploitation cases nationwide must reckon with the short- and long-term psychological impact of repeatedly being exposed to images of helpless children being violated.

Three investigators interviewed by cleveland.com spoke of the taxing nature of the work. All three have to undergo a yearly psychological evaluation to ensure they are still mentally capable of working cases involving child pornography.

click to read the full article at CTPost.com

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Thomas Gahl Video

On September 22nd, 1986 Tom Gahl became the first United States Probation Officer to be killed in the line of duty. This video commemorates the 25th anniversary of his death.